Posts Tagged: import

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Sara Banerji talks at January's LitCaf lunch

Sara Banerji’s 9th novel Blood Precious is out this month. Meet her at the next LitCaf lunch to discuss the joys and sorrows of being an “established” author.   Tickets cost £15, including lunch and a glass of wine. and can be bought on the day. Contact Sara Banerji (sara.banerji@ntlworld.com) to book a place.   Visit Sara’s websites…www.banerji.infowww.myspace.com/ladyacs Originally

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The Children's Book Show

The Children’s Bookshow is an annual tour which takes the best writers and illustrators of children’s literature to perform in theatres around the countryduring National Children’s Book Week (October 2-8) and beyond. This year’s tour will be called Other Words, Other Worlds will be touring the best writers in translation this autumn from Japan, France,

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Children's Literature Conference

Addresses themes of nostalgia and loss, facial disfigurement, children in war, anger and rivalry, friendship, mirroring and fragmentation, magic and myth, and science-fiction.   The conference, which features presentations by renowned writers including Margaret Rustin and Michael Rustin, is a must for teachers, librarians, writers, psychotherapists, and indeed everyone thinking about how books and the media

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What's the Greatest Innovation?

‘What’s the Greatest Innovation?’ is a survey of key thinkers in science, technology and medicine, conducted by spiked in collaboration with the research-based pharmaceutical company Pfizer. Each contributor was asked to identify what they see as the greatest innovation in their field. More than a hundred experts and authorities, including half-a-dozen Nobel laureates, have responded.

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Living in a 'Surveillance Society'

Britain now has more CCTV cameras than any other country, a national identity card in the pipeline and myriad other measures of regulation and surveillance. The official Information Commissioner claims that we are ‘sleepwalking into a surveillance society’, while the authorities insist that their aim is to protect the public and that those who have

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